Response to nicholas carrs is google

But according to him, the blessing has also been a curse. However, it could be argued that although these distractions are present, those individuals who would think critically about information gleaned from print media will still question and consider the information gathered from the internet.

Now my concentration often starts to drift after two or three pages. I think this manifests itself in modern politics and ideologies as well.

Choose Type of service. My mind would get caught up in the narrative or the turns of the argument, and I'd spend hours strolling through long stretches of prose. He does a great job at it also because he provides a good argument with much supportive details.

He even brings out both sides of the argument, but he still mainly focuses on his main idea. Now I zip along the surface like a guy on a Jet Ski. For a writer, researcher, and a blogger like him, the Net has been a blessing, he admits that by putting great volumes of information at his fingertips.

The Web has captured our attention and is now the default starting point for almost all work. They are tailored to produce more immediate and short term solutions to provide instant gratification for a public that demands instant results.

Our concerns are about the qualitative differences in how net-gen students think and write and learn. What Google and the Web are doing is helping us re-claim our human legacy of learning through a rapid exchange of ideas in a social setting. He takes a more skeptical approach to the Internet and its increased use as a medium for reading.

Therefore as Socrates was wrong, when comes to the written world: I think that ambiguity is tied to tolerance and understanding, and if we lose those capabilities we are losing an important part of the human experience.

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The information derived from the internet and the way in which it is interpreted differs very little from traditional print media. I get fidgety, lose the thread, begin looking for something else to do.

We find ourselves creating knowledge continually and rapidly as our social contacts on the Web expand.

We find ourselves once again the naturally gregarious humans we always were. This article is about one skill that he believes is being eroded, that of reading: The information derived from the internet and the way in which it is interpreted differs very little from traditional print media.

The internet enables a greater number of people access to knowledge based information and rather than creating a void of real knowledge, encourages critical thought and intellectual development outside of traditional boundaries.

Google is, indeed, making us smarter as we re-discover new ways to learn. Nicholas Carr is giving voice to these concerns. The way that Carr describes the aims of Google, a company at the forefront of Internet development is a little disconcerting. Indeed, some people reading this article may believe that Carr has hit the nail on the head.

Like reactions to the printing press, science and theories of evolution, not everyone is comfortable with change. Nevertheless, the internet has not brought about the end of the world and recent events such as the Arab Spring indicate that it has the potential to influence change in a positive way.

Ambiguity is not an opening for insight but a bug to be fixed. But, his own criticism is superficial and misses the humanizing impact of Web 2.

The deep reading that used to come naturally has become a struggle. I think that the mental discipline we derive from deciphering and interpreting a text is incredibly important and we are beginning to lose that practice.

“Is Google Making Us Stupid?” Reading Response

Any new information technology has both supports and critics. There is no question that our habits are changing: The Web has captured our attention and is now the default starting point for almost all work.

There is no structured peer review process to filter incorrect information. That's rarely the case anymore.Feb 10,  · No, Google is not making us stupid. What Google and the Web are doing is helping us to learn through a rapid exchange of ideas in a social setting.

Google is, indeed, making us smarter as we re-discover new ways to learn. Any new information technology has both supports and critics. Thousands of years ago. “Is Google Making Us Stupid?” Reading Response.

Nicholas Carr’s article, “Is Google Making us Stupid?” appeared in the The Atlantic. Feb 08,  · My initial response to Nicholas Carr’s article was: sounds interesting.

Just by hearing the title, I wanted to read it because one time I read a small joke that Google posted up about how Google may be God; via palmolive2day.com Aside from that, Carr proves a good point and the generation y is consumed by the internet. Nicholas Carr’s article, “Is Google Making us Stupid?” appeared in the The Atlantic Monthly and discussed his theory that the internet is rewiring the way that the human mind operates.

Response to Nicholas Carr's "Is Google Making Us Stupid?" The internet is a technology which has had a significant impact on the way many people conduct their lives - Response to Nicholas Carr's "Is Google Making Us Stupid?" introduction.

Is Google Making Us Stupid? A few Google searches, some quick clicks on hyperlinks, and I’ve got the telltale fact or pithy quote I was after.

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Response to nicholas carrs is google
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